4 Turkish political parties condemn US resolution recognizing Armenian genocide

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Turkish Parliament / AFP PHOTOS

In a rare of show of unity, four political parties in the Turkish Parliament on Friday condemned a US resolution that recognizes the killing of Armenians during the final days of the Ottoman Empire as genocide.

In a joint declaration signed by the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP), the main opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP), the Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) and the İYİ (Good) Party, the parties said they condemn and the reject the resolution, approved by the US Senate on Thursday, which they said distorts historical facts and flouts the fundamental rules of international law.

“The decision, which lacks any legal value … is part of a dirty game,” added the declaration.

The parties called on historians to accurately inform the public about the events in question, adding that Turkey has opened up its rich archives for all researchers, including Armenians.

“The decision of the US Senate is null and void in terms of history and law as well as our esteemed nation and the global community,” it added.

The Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) did not extend its support to the declaration. In a statement, the party said neither the US resolution nor the declaration issued by the Turkish political parties help to heal the wounds of the people who suffered during the incidents.

Although the Turkish government acknowledges that many Armenians were killed by Ottoman soldiers, it outright rejects the term genocide.

Ankara argues that the Armenian death toll was much lower than reported and that people on both sides died as a result of wartime unrest.

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1 COMMENT

  1. Whether or not events in eastern Turkey at the end of the First World War be called genocide is a question of the definition of the word genocide. After a hundred years, this problem should probably belong to historians.
    In my view, the US resolution is an attempt to express disagreement with Turkey’s policy, but at the same time not formally clearly comment on current events. Such as whether to call the situation in northern Syria ethnic cleansing.
    I would equally be interested in the opinion of the Turkish political parties named in the article. But I understand that expressing something other than clear agreement is asking for a problem.

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