New York Times: The Scale of Turkey’s Purge Is Nearly Unprecedented

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cumhurbaskani abdullah Gul yeni adli yil acilis torenine katildi..Yuksek yargi

Mass scale purges in Turkey after failed coup continue getting reaction from world media.

New York Times said in its story that rarely in modern history has a leader detained and fired as many perceived adversaries as President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey has since a failed coup attempt last month. The paper made a comparision about how it would like if purges in Turkey could take place in the US. Here is how Mr. Erdogan’s vast purge would look if Americans were targeted at a similar scale.

Almost 9,000 police officers fired. This is like firing every police officer in Philadelphia, Dallas,Detroit, Boston and Baltimore.

The Interior Ministry fired the police officers, some of whom government officials said had supported the coup attempt. Turkish officials have acknowledged that the number of people targeted in the purge is probably much greater than the number of conspirators.

21,000 private school teachers suspended

Like revoking the licenses of every third teacher in private elementary and high schools across the United States.

In addition to the teachers suspended, the government intends to close more than 1,000 private schools it linked to Fethullah Gulen, a cleric who the government said was the mastermind of the coup attempt. (Mr. Gulen has denied this, and his level of involvement remains unclear.) Education officials said they planned to convert the schools into public schools and hire 40,000 new teachers.

10,012 soldiers detained Like taking nearly every fourth officer in the U.S. Army into custody.

Since then, nearly half of the top generals and admirals have been jailed or dismissed and more than 5,000 army officials have been sent to pretrial detention.

2,745 members of the judiciary suspended Like suspending every state judge in California, Texas, New York and Georgia.

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