Turkish police to detain another woman immediately after delivery

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A group of police officers waited outside a private hospital in Turkey’s Yalova province in order to detain a woman who had given birth several hours earlier, according to a tweet by the MağduriyetlerTR account.

Havva Hamamcıoğlu, who delivered a baby on Friday night, will be detained over alleged links to the faith-based Gülen movement. Her husband, Nazmi Hamamcıoğlu, was arrested on Friday on the same charges, @magduriyetlertr Twitter account wrote.

The tweet, which included a photo of Havva with her newborn baby, also said the couple has a six-year-old son.

This is not the first time Turkish police have detained a woman in a hospital after delivery.

On June 2, Elif Aslaner, a religious education teacher who gave birth to a baby May 31 at a private hospital in Bursa, was detained due to alleged links to the Gülen movement, which Turkish government accuse of masterminding a failed coup last summer.

In May, Aysun Aydemir, an English teacher who gave birth to a baby in an elective cesarean procedure, was detained at the hospital and subsequently arrested by a court and put in pretrial detention with a 3-day-old baby in Zonguldak province as part of a witch-hunt targeting the Gülen movement.

In late January, Fadime Günay, who gave birth to a baby, was detained by police at Antalya’s Alanya Başkent Hospital as part of the witch-hunt targeting the Gülen movement.

In early January, Ş.A., a former private school teacher and mother of a week-old premature infant, was taken into police custody over links to the Gülen movement while she was on her way to the hospital to feed the baby.

A day after Ş.A. was taken into police custody, another woman known as Meryem gave birth to twins by C-section at a hospital in Konya and was detained by police despite hospital reports said that she should not travel and was taken to Aksaray from Konya in a police car.

More than 17,000 women in Turkey, many with small children, have been jailed in an unprecedented crackdown and subjected to torture and ill-treatment in detention centers and prisons as part of the government’s systematic campaign of intimidation and persecution of critics and opponents, a new report titled “Jailing Women In Turkey: Systematic Campaign of Persecution and Fear” released in April by the Stockholm Center for Freedom (SCF) has revealed.

Turkey survived a military coup attempt on July 15 that killed over 240 people and wounded more than a thousand others. Immediately after the putsch, the Justice and Development Party (AKP) government along with President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan pinned the blame on the Gülen movement.

Fethullah Gülen, who inspired the movement, strongly denied having any role in the failed coup and called for an international investigation into it, but President Erdoğan — calling the coup attempt “a gift from God” — and the government initiated a widespread purge aimed at cleansing sympathizers of the movement from within state institutions, dehumanizing its popular figures and putting them in custody.

According to a report by the state-run Anadolu news agency on May 28, 154,694 individuals have been detained and 50,136 have been jailed due to alleged Gülen links since the failed coup attempt.

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